Moving forward

Hey
I posted some weeks ago about how exciting it was to initiate and launch a new fine art project. I had just taken my first exposures with my new 4x5" field camera and was anxious to get on with the work.

I have now had the time to process the film from the first exposures that I took up in Tromsø. The leaf negatives just look awesome. I can't understand why I've had such a long break from working analogue. Nevertheless, I'm there again now and it's really nice to go back to the roots. Not that I don't like shooting digital. That's amazing in its own way. My professional assignments and all commercial jobs are done digitally. I couldn't do it without my digital gear. Nothing can beat the digital technique when it comes to efficiency and control. But that's of little importance when working with fine art photography. The idéa, the concept, the story, the authenticity. That matters for all photography. But add aeons of time needed and also the fact that you can't see the results until you have been in the lab and developed your exposures - and you have a procedure that really test your patience, stamina and determination. Because all that combined forces you to think things through in a different way. And for me, that boosts my creativity.

Analogue large format photography is slow photography in its purest form where every exposure is meticulously prepared. 4 exposures in a session is a good result for me. Ridiculously, I know. But I love it.

Cheers, Andreas.

Yours truly checking out possible positions with the field camera in full daylight to be prepared later at night when shooting for real (© Pär Jadelius)

Yours truly checking out possible positions with the field camera in full daylight to be prepared later at night when shooting for real (© Pär Jadelius)